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United States Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II

The A-10 Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft to be specifically designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective, and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles.

The A-10 has excellent maneuverability at low air speeds and altitude, and is a highly accurate and survivable weapons-delivery platform. It can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time and operate in low ceiling and visibility conditions. The A-10’s wide combat radius and short takeoff and landing capability permit operations in and out of locations near front lines. Using night vision goggles, A-10 pilots can conduct their missions in darkness.

Thunderbolt IIs have Nigh Vision Imaging Systems (NVIS), goggle compatible single-seat cockpits forward of their wings and a large bubble canopy which provides pilots all-around vision. The pilots are protected by titanium armor that also protects parts of the flight-control system. The redundant primary structural sections allow the aircraft to enjoy better survivability during close air support than previous aircraft. It can survive direct hits from armor-piercing and high explosive projectiles up to 23mm. Their self-sealing fuel cells are protected by internal and external foam. Manual systems back up their redundant hydraulic flight-control systems. This allows pilots to fly and land when hydraulic power is lost.

The Thunderbolt II can be serviced and operated from austere bases with limited facilities near battle areas. Many of the aircraft’s parts are interchangeable left and right, including the engines, main landing gear and vertical stabilizers. Avionics equipment includes multi-band communications; Global Positioning System and inertial navigations systems; infrared and electronic countermeasures against air-to-air and air-to-surface threats. Additionally, it has a heads-up display flight and weapons delivery information.

General Characteristics:

  • Primary Function: Close air support, airborne forward air control, combat search and rescue
  • Thrust: 9,065 pounds per engine
  • Wingspan: 57 feet, 6 inches (17.42 meters)
  • Length: 53 feet, 4 inches (16.16 meters)
  • Weight: 29,000 pounds (13,145 kg); Maximum Takeoff Weight: 51,000 pounds (22,950kg); Fuel Capacity: 11,000 pounds (7,257kg)
  • Payload: 16,000 pounds (7,257kg)
  • Speed: 450 nautical miles per hour (Mach 0.75)
  • Range: 2580 miles (2240 nautical miles)
  • Ceiling: 45,000 feet (13,636 meters)

 

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U.S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue Demonstration

A Coast Guard search and rescue demonstration is provided by an MH-60T Jayhawk helicopter and qualified aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod. The aircrew consists of two pilots, one flight mechanic and a rescue swimmer. Depending on the nature of distress, the rescue swimmer can deploy via freefall or hoist to provide assistance. These dedicated professionals assume the watch 24 hours a day, 365 days a year standing true to the Coast Guard’s motto “Semper Paratus,” which means “Always Ready.” The Sikorsky built helicopter is a twin-engine, single main rotor, MEDEVAC-capable search and rescue (SAR) helicopter operated by the United States Coast Guard. It is the Coast Guard’s Medium Range Recovery helicopter, operating at 9 air stations throughout the United States. It has an average cruising speed of 125 KIAS, a range of 300 nautical miles, and an endurance of approximately 6 hours.

 

B-17 Yankee Lady

The B-17 Yankee Lady, also called the Flying Fortress, was a U.S. heavy bomber used during World War II. The B-17 was designed by the Boeing Aircraft Company in response to a 1934 Air Army Corps specification that called for a four-engined bomber at a time when two engines were the norm.

Did you know? In the Pacific, the aircraft earned a deadly reputation with the Japanese, who dubbed them the “four engine fighters.” The Flying Fortress was also legendary for its ability to stay in the air after several damaging attacks.

  • Top Speed: 287mph
  • Wingspan: 104’0″ Range: 2,000 miles
  • Engine Type: Radial Engine
  • Number Built: 12,731

The Yankee Air Museum is offering Air Adventures on board the pristine Boeing B-17G “Yankee Lady” for $450.00 per person during its appearance at the Bethpage Air Show at Jones Beach.  The plane will be at the American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport, in Farmingdale.  An Air Adventure provides a person with a multi-sensory, immersive experience in the type of World War II aircraft commonly called a Flying Fortress.

Your Air Adventure begins with a briefing and then you take your station.  The authenticity of this craft is spellbinding.  After taxiing and takeoff, you will have 25 minutes in the air.  Upon reaching a cruising speed of 150mph at an altitude of 1200 feet you are able to move to other positions in the Fort, including the Plexiglas nose, flight deck, bomb bay, radio room and waist gunnery section.

As your mission ends you’ll better know the courage of the sky men who flew vast armadas of these majestic aircraft, who commanded the clouds and rode on thunder, and you too will step off exclaiming “that was amazing!”

Yankee Air Museum is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization, therefore a portion of the Air Adventure cost may be tax deductible. Consult your tax professional.  A limited number of seats are available.  For more information about the B-17 visit to Farmingdale, New York, including Air Adventure information visit www.yankeeairmuseum.org and click on “Book a Flight” or call Megan Dziekan 734-483-4030 ext. 232.

For a 90 second video glimpse into a FLEX Ride aboard our aircraft visit:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rkfBZgPnQI

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106th Air National Guard Rescue Wing

The 106th Rescue Wing deploys worldwide to provide combat search and rescue coverage for U.S. and allied forces. They are a World-Class Team of diverse, adaptable personnel recovery focused war fighters with a mission to provide worldwide Personnel Recovery, Combat Search and Rescue Capability, Expeditionary Combat Support, and Civil Search and Rescue Support to Federal and State authorities. The 106th Air National Guard Rescue Wing provides Personnel Recovery to the state of New York and deployed operations that they are tasked to support and provide trained and equipped personnel, capable of augmenting active duty forces in time of war, national emergencies and increased national security. Additionally, they assist the State of New York in disaster relief and other state emergencies as directed by the governor.

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U.S. Navy Blue Angels

The Blue Angels represent the finest from the Navy and Marine Corps. Each member, whether officer or enlisted, is hand-picked from the fleet to be part of the Blue Angels team. Every year, this select group begins a two or three-year rotation traveling across the country and around the world to perform for millions of spectators.

The Blue Angels have flown over 10 different aircraft in the team’s 72 year history. Originally, the team flew four aircraft in the signature “Diamond” formation and expanded to six aircraft to showcase both the diamond and solos high performance capability as well as the precision formation flying taught to all Naval Aviators. Today, the squadron flies the Boeing F/A-18 Hornet and the Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules. When the squadron receives a F/A-18 Hornet from the fleet, which are at the end of their carrier arrestment functionality, we make a variety of modifications, including removing the nose cannon to install a smoke-fluid system, inverting a fuel pump, installing a stop watch and adjustable constant-tension stick spring, as well as the world-wide recognizable paint scheme.

The first Jet-Assisted Take-Off (JATO) performance by the Blue Angels’ C-130, affectionately known as “Fat Albert”, took place at NAS Pensacola, FL in November of 1975. Eight solid fuel JATO rocket bottles, each producing 1,000 pounds of thrust, helped propel Fat Albert skyward and captivated millions of spectators each year. These JATO bottles were produced in the Vietnam era to help aircraft take off from short, unimproved runways at heavy weights. The last known stockpile of JATO bottles were expended during the Blue Angels’ 2009 show season and ended with the last JATO performance for Fat Albert at the NAS Pensacola, FL Air Show in November of 2009.

Every year, a total of 16 Officers and nearly 100 enlisted men and women volunteer for duty with the Blue Angels. Team members are well-rounded representatives of fleet counterparts and selection is extremely competitive. Each squadron member is individually selected. There are certain requirements that the squadron looks for in hiring a team member, and applicants must be career-oriented Sailors or Marines recommended for Blue Angels duty by their current Commanding Officer.

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Golden Knights

 

For over fifty-six years members of the U. S. Army Parachute Team have been marking the milestones of achievement and an evolution of excellence serving as “Ambassadors” of the Army’s only official Demonstration team. The Golden Knights portray the image of being the most formidable parachuting competitors and demonstrators in the world today. If you mention the name “Golden Knights” to someone today in any of the fifty states, and most likely what comes to mind is a phenomenal demonstration they watched in past years at an air show or sporting event. But if you mention it to a sport parachutist, they will most probably think of the competitors they jumped against or heard about in parachute meets across the country or abroad.

 

TEAM HISTORY

The Strategic Army Command Parachute Team, or STRAC, was formed in 1959 by nineteen “Airborne” Soldiers from various military units. Brigadier General Joseph Stilwell Jr. was responsible for gathering these Soldiers with the original intent to knightscompete during the Cold War effort. This new U.S. All-Army team swept the international competition circuit, in what was then the Soviet dominated sport

of skydiving. Later that year, on November 1st, this newly formed team performed their first demonstration in Danville, Virginia.

 

In 1961, the Department of Defense announced on June 15th, that the STRAC team would become the United States Army Parachute Team. The team is one

of three authorized DoD aerial demonstration teams, along with the Thunderbirds and Blue Angels.

 

On October 15, 1962 the team earned the nickname the “Golden Knights” on the competition field of battle. Golden, signifying the gold medals the team had won; Knights, proving that they were world champions and the fact that the Team had “conquered the skies.”

 

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