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U.S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue Demonstration

A Coast Guard search and rescue demonstration is provided by an MH-60T Jayhawk helicopter and qualified aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod. The aircrew consists of two pilots, one flight mechanic and a rescue swimmer. Depending on the nature of distress, the rescue swimmer can deploy via freefall or hoist to provide assistance. These dedicated professionals assume the watch 24 hours a day, 365 days a year standing true to the Coast Guard’s motto “Semper Paratus,” which means “Always Ready.” The Sikorsky built helicopter is a twin-engine, single main rotor, MEDEVAC-capable search and rescue (SAR) helicopter operated by the United States Coast Guard. It is the Coast Guard’s Medium Range Recovery helicopter, operating at 9 air stations throughout the United States. It has an average cruising speed of 125 KIAS, a range of 300 nautical miles, and an endurance of approximately 6 hours.

 

F-22 Raptor

The F-22 Raptor is the Air Force’s newest fighter aircraft that performs both air-to-air and air-to-ground missions, allowing full realization of operational concepts vital to the 21st century Air Force. It was designed to project air dominance, rapidly and at great distances and defeat threats attempting to deny access to our nation’s Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps. The F-22 Cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft.

The F-22 possesses a sophisticated sensor suite, allowing the pilot to track, identify, shoot, and kill air-to-air threats before being detected. Significant advances in cockpit design and sensor fusion improve the pilot’s situational awareness.

The engines produce more thrust than any current fighter engine. The combination of sleek aerodynamic design and increased thrust allows the F-22 to cruise at supersonic airspeeds (greater than 1.5 Mach) without using afterburning – a characteristic known as supercruise. Supercruise greatly expands the F-22’s operating envelope in both speed and range over current fighters, which must use fuel-consuming afterburner to operate at supersonic speeds.

The F-22 will have better reliability and maintainability than any fighter aircraft in history. Increased F-22 reliability and maintainability pays off in less manpower required to fix the aircraft and the ability to operate more efficiently.

General characteristics
Primary function: air dominance, multi-role fighter
Thrust: 35,000-pound class (each engine)
Wingspan: 44 feet, 6 inches (13.6 meters)
Length: 62 feet, 1 inch (18.9 meters)
Height: 16 feet, 8 inches (5.1 meters)
Weight: 43,340 pounds (19,700 kilograms)
Maximum takeoff weight: 83,500 pounds (38,000 kilograms)
Fuel capacity: internal: 18,000 pounds (8,200 kilograms); with 2 external wing fuel tanks: 26,000 pounds (11,900 kilograms)
Speed:  Mach-two class with supercruise capability
Range: more than 1,850 miles ferry range with two external wing fuel tanks (1,600 nautical miles)
Ceiling: above 50,000 feet (15 kilometers)

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Royal Canadian Air Force Snowbirds

The Canadian Forces Snowbirds (431 Air Demonstration Squadron) is a Canadian icon comprised of serving members of the Canadian Armed Forces. Their pilots and technicians work as a team to bring thrilling performances to the North American public. Serving as Canadian ambassadors, the Snowbirds demonstrate the Skill, Professionalism and Teamwork inherent in the women and men of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and the Canadian Armed Forces.

The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and its contribution to the Second World War air effort and the Allied victory was an important chapter in Canada’s history, leaving a legacy in our communities for generations to come.

 

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U.S. Navy Blue Angels

The Blue Angels represent the finest from the Navy and Marine Corps. Each member, whether officer or enlisted, is hand-picked from the fleet to be part of the Blue Angels team. Every year, this select group begins a two or three-year rotation traveling across the country and around the world to perform for millions of spectators.

The Blue Angels have flown over 10 different aircraft in the team’s 72 year history. Originally, the team flew four aircraft in the signature “Diamond” formation and expanded to six aircraft to showcase both the diamond and solos high performance capability as well as the precision formation flying taught to all Naval Aviators. Today, the squadron flies the Boeing F/A-18 Hornet and the Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules. When the squadron receives a F/A-18 Hornet from the fleet, which are at the end of their carrier arrestment functionality, we make a variety of modifications, including removing the nose cannon to install a smoke-fluid system, inverting a fuel pump, installing a stop watch and adjustable constant-tension stick spring, as well as the world-wide recognizable paint scheme.

The first Jet-Assisted Take-Off (JATO) performance by the Blue Angels’ C-130, affectionately known as “Fat Albert”, took place at NAS Pensacola, FL in November of 1975. Eight solid fuel JATO rocket bottles, each producing 1,000 pounds of thrust, helped propel Fat Albert skyward and captivated millions of spectators each year. These JATO bottles were produced in the Vietnam era to help aircraft take off from short, unimproved runways at heavy weights. The last known stockpile of JATO bottles were expended during the Blue Angels’ 2009 show season and ended with the last JATO performance for Fat Albert at the NAS Pensacola, FL Air Show in November of 2009.

Every year, a total of 16 Officers and nearly 100 enlisted men and women volunteer for duty with the Blue Angels. Team members are well-rounded representatives of fleet counterparts and selection is extremely competitive. Each squadron member is individually selected. There are certain requirements that the squadron looks for in hiring a team member, and applicants must be career-oriented Sailors or Marines recommended for Blue Angels duty by their current Commanding Officer.

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Golden Knights

 

For over fifty-six years members of the U. S. Army Parachute Team have been marking the milestones of achievement and an evolution of excellence serving as “Ambassadors” of the Army’s only official Demonstration team. The Golden Knights portray the image of being the most formidable parachuting competitors and demonstrators in the world today. If you mention the name “Golden Knights” to someone today in any of the fifty states, and most likely what comes to mind is a phenomenal demonstration they watched in past years at an air show or sporting event. But if you mention it to a sport parachutist, they will most probably think of the competitors they jumped against or heard about in parachute meets across the country or abroad.

 

TEAM HISTORY

The Strategic Army Command Parachute Team, or STRAC, was formed in 1959 by nineteen “Airborne” Soldiers from various military units. Brigadier General Joseph Stilwell Jr. was responsible for gathering these Soldiers with the original intent to knightscompete during the Cold War effort. This new U.S. All-Army team swept the international competition circuit, in what was then the Soviet dominated sport

of skydiving. Later that year, on November 1st, this newly formed team performed their first demonstration in Danville, Virginia.

 

In 1961, the Department of Defense announced on June 15th, that the STRAC team would become the United States Army Parachute Team. The team is one

of three authorized DoD aerial demonstration teams, along with the Thunderbirds and Blue Angels.

 

On October 15, 1962 the team earned the nickname the “Golden Knights” on the competition field of battle. Golden, signifying the gold medals the team had won; Knights, proving that they were world champions and the fact that the Team had “conquered the skies.”

 

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